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Baking For Success

 

Looking for an excellent new teaching tool to add to your curriculum?

Baking For Success Baking for Success: Lessons that Go Beyond Kneading Dough

Try the Home Baking Association's (HBA) latest teaching tool - a comprehensive, interdisciplinary video and curriculum - developed by family and consumer science experts who understand your classroom needs. It will inspire your students with:

  • Three baking segments: brownies, focaccia, and corn bread
  • Science, social/ethnic studies and math lessons
  • Teamwork, leadership and decision-making skills
The video and curriculum are presented in a fun, upbeat manner to excite students about baking. The video and curriculum are designed to appeal to middle level through secondary level students. In addition, the materials list specific goals and objectives for each lesson. For only $20 (includes video, curriculum, shipping and handling) you'll be one step closer to a great resource that will help teach your students lessons in baking and lessons in life.

To order, print, clip and fill out the application and send it along with a $20 check (made payable to the Home Baking Association) to:

Home Baking Association
2931 SW Gainsboro Road
Topeka, KS 66614
Telephone: 785-478-3283

 

More information on the Baking for Success video:

Each of the three lessons offers activities targeting three levels of learning experience. Although you know best which level your students are prepared for - first experience, intermediate or advanced - the experience levels are broadly defined.

  • The first experience is developed for children in grades three through five or for anyone with little or no baking experience.
  • The intermediate experience is created for youth in grades six through nine or those with some baking experience.
  • The advanced experience is designed for youth in grades ten through twelve or those familiar with baking techniques.
Lessons vary from take-home to in-school research and labs. We've selected baking activities that can be done is as little as 50 minutes. Even if kitchen labs are limited, there are valuable skills to be gained in each lesson. You also may want to share some of the assignments with an educator in another discipline.

 

Unit One : Brownies Unit Two : Corn Bread Unit Three : Focaccia

 

 

Unit One : Brownies

Overview:
Students will research and report the history and consumer preference for chocolate brownies in American culture, prepare from scratch either fudge or cake brownies and evaluate the resources required.

Objectives:

  • Examine the cultural history and popularity of chocolate, cookies and brownies.
  • Read and follow directions to organize the production of scratch-prepared brownies.
  • Apply the use of fractions, percentages, accurate measurement, temperature and volume.
  • Examine why a specific flour is used.
  • Calculate and evaluate the resources used for scratch, mix and bakery-made brownies.
  • Design and conduct consumer preference research to report on a local market.
  • Explain how brownies fit into a healthful diet and the benefits they offer families.

 

 

Unit Two : Corn Bread

Overview:
Students will research and report the history and variety of methods used to produce corn bread in Native and early American cultures, organize and prepare from scratch a leavened corn bread and experiment with quick bread chemical leavenings.

Objectives:

  • Examine the cultural history of corn and wheat as staple grains in America.
  • Read and follow directions to organize the production of scratch-prepared corn bread.
  • Apply the use of fractions, accurate measurement, temperature and volume.
  • Prepare an experiment and create the leavening reaction occurring in the batter.
  • Survey supermarkets for traditional or staple grain products.
  • Explain how corn bread and grain foods fit into a healthful diet, how many servings students need and the nutritional and cultural benefits corn bread and grain foods provide.
  • Plan a traditional or new menu for a full meal around corn bread, incorporating goals of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Food Guide Pyramid.

 

 

Unit Three : Focaccia

Overview:
Students will research and report about the history and role of traditional bread in family meals and cultures, organize and prepare from scratch a traditional flatbread - Italian focaccia and conduct fermentation experiments with baker's yeast.

Objectives:

  • Examine the cultural history and value of traditional staple foods and yeast breads.
  • Read and follow directions to organize the production of an Italian focaccia.
  • Apply the use of fractions, accurate measurement, temperature and volume.
  • Determine the effects of temperature, sugar starch and salt on yeast fermentation.
  • Explain how breads fit into a healthful diet and the benefits they offer.
  • Explore how focaccia is served in food services and restaurants by researching menus.
  • Develop your own focaccia entrée.